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Event

Lecture: Carl De Keyzer on Cuba La Lucha

Date: Sunday 2 October
Time: 13:30 – 14:30
Entrance: free

Magnum-photographer Carl De Keyzer (1958) stayed in Cuba for three months. He made a series on the uncertain transition from communism to capitalism.

Struggle, the need to survive, a lust for life: the meaning of the Spanish word la lucha pertains to the hard lives of Cubans trying to take care of themselves as well as to their optimism. It is an often­-heard phrase in current day Cuba, a country changing a communist system for a capitalist one. Part of the population hopes for a better future. Others mostly fear the uncertainty that awaits them.

BredaPhoto shows the first large scale exhibition of his series Cuba La Lucha (2016). De Keyzer shuns photographical cliches. So we won’t get to see shuffling old ladies in the street or run down taxis. Instead, he photographed strong personalities and surprising scenes in this once secluded society. He shows a terrace where tourists can buy postcards of Fidel Castro and Che Guevara, and a run­down taxi with a hypermodern video system.

The Belgian photographer has done several projects on the fall of communism. In the 1980s he travelled through the Soviet Union and made the book Homo Sovieticus (1989). East of Eden (1996) was the result of two years travelling through Eastern Europe. For Zona (2003) he photographed daily life in Siberian prisons. De Keyzer is a member of the renowned photographer agency Magnum Photos.

Havana, Cuba 2015. Book 'Cuba, La Lucha'.

Havana, Cuba 2015. Book ‘Cuba, La Lucha’.

Peter DiCampo & Austin Merrill – Everyday Africa
Exhibition at MOTI from 15 September till 30 October

War, poverty, exotism: Africa is a continent plagued by persistent stereotypes. But social media can change that.

Through Instagram, African photographers can share pictures of everyday Africa with a large audience. A selection of these images is to be seen at MOTI during BredaPhoto.

Sun 2 October / 15:00 – 16:00 / Stadsgalerij / free entrance
Presentation on Everyday Africa with initiators Peter DiCampo & Austin Merrill



Omotore is a 21-year-old albino Afro hip hop artist in Lagos, Nigeria. He is using his music to voice some of the stereotypical issues his fellow albinos face. He has constantly been discouraged by even show promoters that he will never make it as an Albino and often has to pay them to get a show on, but he has not given up. He strongly believes there is hope to become successful as an albino. No doubt Salif Keita, the famous Malian musician, is one of them. Photo by Tom Saater @tomsaater

Omotore is a 21-year-old albino Afro hip hop artist in Lagos, Nigeria. He is using his music to voice some of the stereotypical issues his fellow albinos face. He has constantly been discouraged by even show promoters that he will never make it as an Albino and often has to pay them to get a show on, but he has not given up. He strongly believes there is hope to become successful as an albino. No doubt Salif Keita, the famous Malian musician, is one of them.
Photo by Tom Saater @tomsaater

Ginika is on her way to join thousands of Nigerian law graduates called to bar in Abuja. Photo by Tom Saater @tomsaater

Ginika is on her way to join thousands of Nigerian law graduates called to bar in Abuja.
Photo by Tom Saater @tomsaater

The Absent State: photographer Bryan Schutmaat talks about drifters, hitchhikers and other travellers

Time: 13:30h
Entrance: free

Bryan Schutmaat (USA) portrayed drifters, hitchhikers and other travellers in the southern United States. They escaped the safety of their homes, the pressure of consumerism or oppressive government ties.

Schutmaat is one of the five photographers of The Absent State, a unique collaboration between BredaPhoto and World Press Photo about self-sustainability in countries where there’s a minimal welfare state and social security. We’ve asked five photographers and five writers from five continents to tell their stories. The results can be admired in the exhibition The Absent State in the courtyard of Breda’s Museum.

BP2016 Bryan Schutmaat 4

BP2016 Bryan Schutmaat 2

Michael Wolf (Germany, 1954) refers to his book Informal Solutions (2016), from which he selected photos for his exhibition at BredaPhoto, as an ‘encyclopedia of back alley improvisations’. These ‘informal solutions’ include a self-made seat, plants in unexpected places, a mop that seems part of the street scene, and a mini-break in a random place. With these small interventions people claim their place in the city. In addition to his pictures and short videos, Wolf shows objects he collected through the years. Together, they form an alternative roadmap of the metropolis.

Wolf has been living in Hong Kong part-time since the nineties. He uses a detached style of photographing to register life in megacities. He has made iconic pictures of dense urban architecture that only show high rises. The viewer can only guess at the thousands of lives that take place behind these screened windows. In Paris, he used Google street view for A Series of Unfortunate Events (2010). He photo- graphed the coincidences that happened when Google was mapping the streets. He once said: ‘I have an extreme curiosity about people. Photography allows me to be very curious and get into other people’s lives.’ Wolf won two World Press Photo Awards for his pictures of Chinese factories and the overcrowded Japanese metro system.

BP2016 Michael Wolf lo-res 3

Jaap Scheeren – My house
A house is a safe cocoon, the only place where a person can really be free. For BredaPhoto and MOTI, Jaap Scheeren (NL) made the installation My House. Inside, you’ll see a man who falls into 10.000 eggs in slow motion and prints made with his grandmother’s ashes.

Coralie Vogelaar – Recognized/Not Recognized
Why are some news photos so successful compared to others? For BredaPhoto and MOTI, wondered Coralie Vogelaar (NL) analysed 850.000 news images with the help of image recognition and eye-tracking software. She translated her findings in a surprising video-installation.

VRIJSTAAT MOTI is on show from September 15 until December 31, 2016.